Thursday, August 10, 2006

Girlbomb

And then, I slipped and read another ridiculous non-fiction narritive

Girlbomb: A Halfway Homeless Memoir
Girlbomb: A Halfway Homeless Memoir


I was on vacation and thought I could relax. Holy cats, this book was aweful. The fact that this author threw everyone under the bus who tried to make her life worthwhile as she participated in totally self destructive and irresponsible behavior disgusted me. To date she only cares for a cat and has not even committed to her "partner". Erlbaum's book reads as if her social group were the only teenagers on the planet and New York was the only city where drugs were being sold in the 1980's. It would have been worth the read if Ms Erlbaum had taken any sort of responsibility for her actions and actually attempted to make amends with her mother but she was too spoiled and self centered to reach that point in her life. And apparantly still is. If you want to read about irresponsible behavior from someone who still has no clue about responsibility 20 years later, pick up this book.

Joey




One hundred Years of Solitude

One Hundred Years of Solitude
One Hundred Years of Solitude

And then there was this awesome book! What a great soap opera. I could not put it down. It was checked out at the Grapevine library for the past 6 months so I got the LARGE PRINT version. Gabriel Garcia Marquez mixes the perfect blend of magic, family drama, reality, terror and love to blend the perfect story of a family lineage. I do not know very much about Latin American History, but since this book was actually written in 1970, apparently Garcia Marquez did. Hilarious at times, disturbing at others, I was so captured by this family's story, I read the book in two days. I can certainly see how it achieved the Nobel Prize as it is a true account of humanity. This book sticks with you in your imagination and your dreams. If you ever desired to become an author, One Hundred Years of Solitude could be used as your road map to success.

Joey

Grapes of Wrath - John Stienbeck

Grapes of Wrath
Grapes of Wrath


Amazing!!! I actually read this book last year, before Hurricane Katrina, right before it. I was and still am so concerned about the migration of an entire population across the nation in search of something better. Grapes of Wrath is better than any historical account that my child brought home from school. Steinbeck captured the emotion and daily life of the migrants as they trekked their way across the country looking for the Paradise of California. At the end of this book, I dropped it! You have got to read the whole thing before you make a judgement on migrant workers, legal or illegal migrant pickers or displaced workers. Folks don't leave home because they want to, they leave when they have to.

Joey

Of Human Bondage

Of Human Bondage
Of Human Bondage


Okay here we have another whiny boy. I did not finish this book either after about 100+ pages, I just didn't care. Get over it and move on. 100+ pages of my Mom died and I was sent to live with relatives. Please, I have no interest! I am not the person to be reading this. I hope there are no more boy struggle sagas on the "25 greatest books of the 20th century" list.

Joey

A Girl Named Zippy: Growing Up Small in Mooreland, Indiana
A Girl Named Zippy: Growing Up Small in Mooreland, Indiana



Okay, So I slipped I had to go back to some modern non-fiction narrative. This book was not very good. The author seemed to think her life was some kind of exclusion from reality, but basically she was just a spoiled child. Before she wrote this narrative and proclaimed herself as an anomily because she grew up in a small town she should have read The Liar's Club by Mary Carr
The Liars' Club: A Memoir: 10th Anniversary Edition
The Liars' Club: A Memoir: 10th Anniversary Edition


because that memoir is worth your time to read.

Joey








Saturday, June 10, 2006

Sons and Lover's DH Lawrence

Sons and Lovers (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Sons and Lovers (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Sorry for the delay in posting but....

I couldn't finish it, I tried but I just don't get into that "Golden Boy" thing. You know the one, where the boy can do no wrong and the girls are ignored or worked to dead. I made it as far as part two and couldn't bear to pick up the book again.

Maybe one day, my daughters will have sons and I might pick it up again. I just couldn't bear to read another word of it right now.

Back to the library...

Must be a really well written book.

Sunday, May 07, 2006

Brave New World

Brave New World
Brave New World

This book takes place in Northeast Tarrant County at the beginning of the 21st century. Oh wait no it doesn't, but it could. From the very first chapter this book freaked me out. In vitro fertilization, human preservation practiced for cosmetic reasons and to advert the natural aging process, the "oneness" attitude that prevailed where any action taken mildly against the norm or individual thought process was frowned upon, were all elements that we share up here, but the part that struck me as shocking were the similiarities in mass comsumption! I wonder if Huxley even thought for a moment that his fictional characters' consumption habits would be a reality in less than 100 years from his writing. Brave New World really gets the reader to thinking about the future of the human race if we continue to multiply and consume the Earth.

Check out the Earth's Current Population http://www.netlingo.com/more/poptick.html.

Joey

Monday, April 24, 2006

Mom's pick of the week

Common Sense
Common Sense

http://nikihannevig.blogspot.com Mom's book pick of the week.

Enjoy!

Cat's Cradle

Cat's Cradle
Cat's Cradle

The first time I read Kurt Vonnegut I was stranded in Keystone Colorado during their notorious snowy winters that start in October and run through April. I read Galapagos. I didn't realize it was Vonnegut, but enjoyed the novel and his description of the end of mankind.

Cat's Cradle is just as great of an end of the world story. Common people, could be you or me, screw up everything and end the world. The Bokononists, being the only folks to survive seem to be the only people that are aware of their environmental impact.

The others, the granfallooners, are what we all represent today. A bunch of rah rahs only concerned with how connected we are to our selves, and not the world.

Your thoughts??

Wednesday, April 12, 2006

One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest
One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest

Okay, I work with Nurse Ratchet!!! That aside this was a wonderful book. I am sorry got to see the movie before reading the book. The book is actually from the point of view of the Big Indian Chief Bromden (the one who runs away in the end of the movie). We see his view of the ward as a pretend deaf dumb patient and the changes that take place with the arrival of MacMurphy or Mac as the other patients call him.

Nurse Ratchet is a control monster who uses outdated harmful methods of mind control to keep her power over the patients who are not committed, but there voluntarily (unlike MacMurphy) because they do not have the courage to deal with the real world.

It took me a long time to finish the book because I just didn't want to come to the end. During the course of the story I really started to like MacMurphy. Even though the "sacrafices" he made for the other guys could have been seen by some as selfserving, the other patients benefited far more from the life experiences.

Saturday, March 25, 2006

The Sun Also Rises

The Sun Also Rises
The Sun Also Rises

Call them the lost generation if you want but Jake Barnes and his friends are really just a bunch of drunks who don't want to grow up. More power to them as long as they are having fun with it. I think every generation has a group of lost souls that still struggle with accepting responsibility. For a fun exercise, lets name some of the "Lost Generations" we have seen over the past 80 years. The 30's and 40's are kind of a wash since there wasn't enough prosperity available to nurture the idleness that forms a lost generation. So starting in the 50's there's Beatniks (50's), Hippies (60's), Head Bangers (80's), what do we call those Disco 70's people? Or those 90's Heroine addicts? Leave your posts...

Sunday, March 12, 2006

Confederacy of Dunces
Confederacy of Dunces

This book is hilarious!! John Kennedy Toole truly took himself from this world far too soon. The craziness of New Orleans is so well reflected in the characters and settings. Each character is so well developed you think you've actually met them on the street. The insane actions of desperate souls leave you laughing out loud. Ignatious is such a Buffoon it's no wonder that his own mother doesn't even care for him much anymore. The plight of Officer Mancuseco to do right to keep his job, Jones' attempts to sabotage his employer since he is forced to work in a cathouse, Darlene's dreams of becoming a stripper with her funky bird act, and Mrs. Levy's interest in sparing the senile old office worker a life of total boredom by not allowing her to retire are just to name a few of the outlandish story lines all wove together. This book won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1981 and was posthumous publication.